The Pressure to Look Good Grows

American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery’s Annual Survey Shows Self Improvement Stronger than Ever in Men and Women

NEW YORK, NY, March 5, 2008 – Men and women across the States continue to turn back the hands of time with invasive and non-invasive cosmetic and reconstructive surgery. The annual member survey, conducted by the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS), unveiled a 27 percent increase in surgical and non-surgical activity among men and women since 2000. Men account for 30 percent of the increase while women take credit for 26 percent.

“Our statistics illustrate that facial plastic and reconstructive surgery is not characterized by race, gender, or age,” said AAFPRS President Vito Quatela, MD. “Nineteen percent of cosmetic procedures were performed on non-Caucasian patients.”

Popularity of Procedures by Ethnicity
Over the past 8 years, African American (40 percent), Hispanic (19 percent), and Caucasian (7 percent) cosmetic surgical patients increased. The proportion of Asian American cosmetic surgical patients is down slightly since 2000 (negative 8 percent). In the past year, there has been little change among Caucasian and African American cosmetic surgical patients.

Considering four popular cosmetic surgery procedures, AAFPRS members reported that African Americans are most likely to under go rhinoplasty or nose job surgery (63 percent) as are Hispanics (45 percent). Asian Americans are most likely receiving blepharoplasty or eyelid surgery (39 percent) while Caucasians are more evenly split between rhinoplasty (27 percent), blepharoplasty (24 percent) and face lifts (26 percent).

Once the secret of the elite, cosmetic surgery has now filtered down to the masses. For many minorities, cosmetic surgery is no longer viewed as a sign of self-hatred or a rejection of racial identity. It is about enhancing natural beauty.

Facial cosmetic and reconstructive surgery is now easier to afford, with many surgeons offering financing plans on procedures ranging from $4,800 for a nose job to nearly $7,000 for a face lift. And thanks to reality shows on which unhappy patients of all ethnicities are physically — and emotionally — transformed, it has more publicity than ever before.

“As techniques advance, as downtime dissipates and as pricing becomes more affordable, people are more willing to talk about it and are more accepting of others’ experience with plastic surgery,” said Dr. Quatela.

It’s Not a Girl Thing Anymore
With people staying in the workforce longer, this year’s survey revealed that both men and women requested cosmetic surgery to remain competitive in the workplace (66 percent and 65 percent, respectively).

Also confirmed by 58 percent of participating surgeons was the fact that more patients opted to undergo procedures during the colder months. Surgeons also detailed
that approximately 55 percent of procedures performed in 2007 took place at private offices, and 25 percent at free-standing surgical centers. Nearly 18 percent were performed at hospitals and much fewer at medical spas (3 percent).

AAFPRS surgeons tell that more than half of patients (53 percent) have had multiple procedures in the same year. Most of the patients having multiple procedures in the same year are women (82 percent) versus men (18 percent). “Patients who are fearful of surgery often begin with a small procedure and return pleased with their preliminary results,” commented Dr. Quatela.

Multiple visits may also be attributed to patients having injections, Botox and laser rejuvenation, all of which require regular treatments and follow-up care. The AAFPRS 2007 Member Survey illustrated this trend with a projected 749,200 Botox procedures, 333800 hyaluronic acid injections, 249,600 chemical peels and 56,800 ablative skin resurfacing performed per surgeon. Each of which requires regular visits to maintain the effect.

Men Keeping Their Cool
The quest to look as good as they feel continued strong in men during 2007. This year’s report showed guys turning to both invasive and non-invasive approaches for self-improvement. The most commonly reported 2007 included:

Non-Surgical:

  • Botox
  • Hyaluronic Acid Injections (including but not limited to Juvéderm™, Restylane®, Perlane®)
  • Chemical Peels
  • Microdermabrasion
  • Surgical:

  • Rhinoplasty
  • Facelifts
  • Hair Transplants
  • Women Aging Gracefully
    Women continue to be the most likely candidates for facial plastic surgery: 81 percent of all surgical procedures and 82 percent of all non-surgical procedures were performed on women. This year’s report details that the most common procedures among women:

    Surgical:

  • Facelifts
  • Blepharoplasty
  • Lip Augmentations
  • Rhinoplasty
  • Ablative Skin Resurfacing
  • Non-Surgical:

  • Botox
  • Microdermabrasion
  • Hyaluronic Acid Injections (including but not limited to Juvéderm™, Restylane®, Perlane®)
  • Chemical Peels
  • This year’s report highlighted the inclination among women to request cosmetic surgery in order to remain attractive to a partner or spouse (50 percent). It also showed growth in the practice of moms and daughters venturing in for cosmetic procedures together (34 percent).

    Women Under 35
    For those under 35, rhinoplasty was the most popular surgical procedure performed. Botox, hyaluronic acid, chemical peels and microdermabrasion were also popular among this cohort.

    Chemical peels, once the hot thing, are now sharing the limelight with laser treatments that eliminate little broken blood vessels, sun spots and other bothersome blemishes. These treatments are safe if done correctly by facial plastic surgeons who have undergone training.

    Knowledge is Power
    “Research and do your homework before you seek cosmetic rejuvenation,” emphasized Dr. Quatela and members of the AAFPRS. In 2007, there was an average of 19 revision surgeries performed per surgeon. This year’s survey illustrated that 45 percent of all those who traveled abroad to undergo cosmetic surgery returned to AAFPRS surgeons with requests to correct complications.

    Educating patients is one of the most important roles of facial plastic surgeons, and it’s having a positive effect on both doctors and patients. Today, patients feel more confident and comfortable with their choices to get facial plastic surgery because they play a larger role in the process. In fact, 88 percent of surveyed surgeons reported an increase in patient knowledge regarding plastic surgery in the past year.

    Tomorrow’s Prognosis?
    AAFPRS surgeons are acutely aware that the future of facial plastic surgery is bright. They predict that additional fillers will be introduced into the market and feel that patient safety will continue to be a focal point in cosmetic surgery. Most surgeons forecast that cosmetic surgery will increase for ethnic populations (89 percent) and that more surgeons will offer patients wellness and lifestyle techniques; only 49 percent feel that medical spas will become more popular.

    “We hope the results of the annual survey give some understanding of the dedication that AAFPRS members have to providing the highest quality of facial plastic surgery available. We are optimistic that patients will trust their faces to facial plastic surgeons,” concluded Dr. Quatela.

    About the AAFPRS:
    The AAFPRS is the world’s largest association of facial plastic and reconstructive surgeons with more than 2,800 members – whose cosmetic reconstructive surgery focuses on the face, head and neck. Academy fellows are Board certified and subscribe to a code of ethics. In addition, the AAFPRS provides consumers with free information and brochures and a list of qualified facial plastic surgeons in their area by visiting the AAFPRS Web site, www.facemd.org.