Is Your Cosmetic Injectable The Real Thing? Ensure Your Injection is FDA Approved.

Patient Education and Responsibility Paramount in Safe Use of Cosmetic Injectables

New York, NY, August 27, 2007 – A recent survey by The Physicians Coalition for Injectable Safety suggests that patients do not take simple steps to ensure that the product they are receiving is authentic:

  • Only 0.8% of doctors surveyed stated that their patients always ask to see cosmetic injectable packaging to ensure authenticity. Only 5.2% are sometimes asked for this information.
  • The majority of responding physicians say that patients either never (65.8%) or rarely (27%) ask to see cosmetic injectable packaging to ensure authenticity.
  • The independent study, conducted by Columbus, Ohio based Industry Insights, Inc. asked Coalition physicians, members of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, and the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, their views on informed consent and patient behavior in the injectable arena. Specific to treatment with cosmetic injectables such as Botox or dermal filler, of those surveyed:

  • 85% require patients to sign an informed consent document
  • 97.1% provide verbal information prior to treatment
  • 91.3% provide written information prior to treatment
  • 98.1% include risks of the procedure in patient education information.
  • “Patient education information is not only the responsibility of the doctor, but also the responsibility of the patient,” says Baltimore, Maryland Coalition spokesperson Dr. Ira Papel, M.D., F.A.C.S., Associate Professor, The Johns Hopkins University. “By partnering with your physician and asking the right questions consumers have a better chance of achieving the desired results and averting complications with injectable therapies.”

    The Coalition suggests that all consumers know the following basic information; complete tips and educational materials are available at www.injectablesafety.org:

  • What defines informed consent and why a patient should sign documents with each treatment.
  • How to ensure product authenticity. What does each brand’s product packaging look like? What markings are important to safety?
  • How to choose a qualified doctor/provider of cosmetic injectables.
  • Questions to ask a doctor/provider before any cosmetic injectable treatment.
  • Warning signs that a cosmetic injector might not be a safe or qualified choice to administer treatment.
  • Cautions on the appropriate setting to receive treatments.
  • About Us

    The Physicians Coalition for Injectable Safety is an alliance of specialty physician organizations including the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, and the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. The Coalition’s Mission is to provide the public with unbiased and necessary information on injectable cosmetic treatments, appropriate injectors and where to safely access cosmetic medical procedures. Our goal is to promote treatment supervised by properly qualified and trained, board-certified doctors and to promote only the use of U.S. FDA-approved, appropriately administered product.

    About ASAPS
    The 2400-member American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS), founded in 1967, is the leading professional organization of plastic surgeons certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery who specialize in cosmetic plastic surgery. With 2,100 members in the U.S., Canada, and many other countries, ASAPS is at the forefront of innovation in aesthetic plastic surgery around the world.

    About AAFPRS
    The American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery is the world’s largest specialty association that represents over 2,700 facial plastic and reconstructive surgeons throughout the world. The AAFPRS is a National Medical Specialty Society of the American Medical Association (AMA), and holds an official seat in both the AMA House of Delegates and the American College of Surgeons board of governors. AAFPRS members are board certified surgeons whose focus is surgery of the face, head, and neck.

    About ASOPRS
    The American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery represent surgeons qualified in plastic surgery of the eyelids and surrounding facial structures. Fellows of the Society are board certified in ophthalmology, have completed fellowships in oculoplastic surgery (currently two years), and perform aesthetic, plastic, and reconstructive surgery of the face, orbits, eyelids, and lacrimal system.