FIRST QUARTER 2002, VOLUME 16, NO 1

Ask the Surgeon | What’s New | Health Tip

IN THIS ISSUE

Me, Myself, and I … Do it for yourself

Laser resurfacing … Is it right for me?

Ask the Surgeon / Health Tip / What’s New

Get your facts straight about facial plastic surgery

Ask the Surgeon
I am a heavy smoker. I would like to have surgery on my nose and I am wondering if my smoking habits will affect the surgery.

Yes, your smoking habits will affect your surgery. Smoking causes distinctive changes in the facial skin. Cigarette toxins reduce the blood supply to the tissues, so after having a procedure, the rate of healing is slower and the risk of infection is greater. Smokers tend to have coarser, thicker facial skin that is more prone to wrinkling.

Your surgeon may recommend that you quit smoking several weeks, if not months, before the surgery. As for your rhinoplasty (nose surgery), make a consultation appointment so your physician can evaluate your skin and your nose, and decide what treatment plan is right for you.

Whats New
A new laser has been introduced into the resurfacing arena. The N-Lite laser therapy has been used to treat crow’s feet. It works by penetrating the outermost layer of skin and is absorbed by deeper layers where it stimulates collagen production. Although it is too early to sufficiently judge this new technology, you may want to keep your eyes peeled for more information. Other minor laser treatments include fotofacial and cool touch. These types of treatments are maintenance procedures that require multiple treatments with minimal healing time. See your facial plastic surgeon for more information.

Health Tip
Water is an important resource for our bodies. Most of us know that we should be drinking between six to eight cups of water a day (48 to 64 ounces). Studies have recently shown that this is the minimum amount your body needs; individual consumption varies. How much do you need?

The Mayo Clinic Women’s HealthSource suggests that you take your weight and divide it in half. This number equals the number of ounces your body needs. For example, a person who weighs 160 pounds should be drinking 80 ounces of water, or 10 cups per day. If you exercise (light activity), you should add an additional 8 ounces per hour of exertion. If you drink coffee, tea, or soda, keep in mind that these are diuretics, so you will need to make up for these drinks with extra water intake.

The benefits of water include moisturizing your skin, carrying nutrients through your blood, and transporting toxins out of your system. Water is important for a healthy, glowing complexion.