FIRST QUARTER 2003, VOLUME 17, NO 1

Ask the Surgeon | What’s New | Health Tip

IN THIS ISSUE

Your New Year’s Resolution: Give to Yourself

Recent Survey Reveals Increase in Cosmetic Surgery in all Ethnic Groups

Ask the Surgeon / Health Tip / What’s New

Tattoo Today, Gone Tomorrow

Ask the Surgeon
I am a man in my early fifties who would like to improve the appearance of my skin. I am aware of the thousands of female skincare lines, is there anything specific for men?

There are specialized skin care products just for men. Consult your physician for a specific recommendation for your skin type. These products are designed differently than products for women in that they work to penetrate the thicker skin of a man’s face and counteract the daily irritations of shaving, sun, and pollution. Be wary that some products claiming to be for men are merely repackaged versions of the women’s line. Your best bet is to get a referral from your physician.

Whats New
Medicine ATM machines may be showing up at your physician’s office. You have three kids under five years old and the 18-month old needs a prescription for Amoxicillin. After a difficult visit with the doctor, you cart the kids to the pharmacy. The pharmacist isn’t sure of the handwriting for the dosage, so after a phone call to the pediatrician for verification and the standard 20-minute wait, your ill child can finally get some medicine and go to bed. Is there an easier way? Yes, a company called InstyMeds is introducing the ATM for commonly prescribed medications. The machine is linked to a palm-sized computer that your doctor operates. The software calculates the right dose based on your weight and prints a voucher to insert into the InstyMeds dispenser. This ensures accuracy, provides convenience, and reduces stress. Look for an ATM in your waiting area.L

Health Tip
Numerous studies have shown that solutions containing 60 to 70 percent alcohol are effective skin disinfectants. While in the home it is preferred that you use soap and water, on the run those gels, foams, and lotions are quite efficient. In a recent study, it was found that fewer germs were spread in a hospital setting when alcohol-based cleansers were placed in each patient room. The advantages to you include:

  • no plumbing or sink required
  • less damaging to the skin than soap (most have added moisture emollients)
  • takes one-fourth the time compared to using soap and water On the run or not, the cleansers are not preferred for removing excessive dirt or fluids on the hands.