THIRD QUARTER 2006, VOLUME 20, NUMBER 3

Couples and families go through a unique experience together

IN THIS ISSUE

Minimize revision surgery: How well do you know your surgeon?

Men versus women… Different cosmetic procedures and their reasoning

Ask the Surgeon / Health Tip / What’s New

Couples and families go through a unique experience together

While past vacations may have been spent on the beach or at the amusement park, surgeons are reporting increasing numbers of families spending vacation days having surgery together. In fact, the trend has increased by 37 percent over the last year. It is about sharing an experience together and creating a special bond as you go through it.

Couples, sisters, mothers and daughters—the groupings may vary, but the benefits are the same. Surgery buddies benefit with a bonding experience, an empathetic support system, and an understanding behind the image insecurities and seeking surgery. Additional advantages include shorter convalescent periods and reduced complications.

Couples may have varying reasons behind their procedures, for example Jack T. “I had never really thought about having surgery until my wife started to research getting a facelift,” says Jack. “I accompanied her to the consultation appointment and the question just slipped out, ‘Do you think you could improve some of my wrinkles?’” Jack had filler injections the same day as his wife’s facelift. “I really appreciate my wife’s efforts in looking good for herself and for me. I want to do the same for her.” Jack thinks the experience brought them closer together and is planning additional procedures with his wife.

Another couple decided to celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary by getting surgery together. “It might not be the most common way to celebrate, but it was something that we both really wanted,” says Sarah W., who had rhinoplasty performed the day before her husband Rick’s laser resurfacing. “We really pulled together during the recovery period,” says Rick. “It was nice to have someone to lean on who knew exactly what you were going through.” Rick said that they took two weeks off work. “Okay, so the first week wasn’t like a vacation,” he jokingly offers, “but the second week, we were feeling great and really enjoyed the time off together.”

Kate B. and Brenda M. are sisters who both hated their chins. “I think I was the first one to bring up the idea of getting a chin implant,” says Brenda, “but it didn’t take much to convince Kate once I suggested we go together.”

“I didn’t think we could get it done the same day—but I was so glad we did,” says Kate. “From the consultation to the day of surgery, we talked incessantly about it. Brenda cared as much about my insecurities and questions as much as I cared about hers. And, we both look fantastic now!”

While you may be considering a procedure with your spouse, family member, or friend, facial plastic surgeons caution that you should get surgery for the right reasons. A good candidate wants to improve one’s self-esteem and self-confidence and is not being coerced into treatment. Make an appointment with your facial plastic surgeon to discuss your concerns, your thoughts, and your treatment plans today.