SKIN CANCER DIAGNOSIS? YOU NEED A FACIAL PLASTIC SURGEON ON YOUR TREATMENT TEAM

Everyone’s skin tells a story about their health and history, but what does it say after skin cancer surgery, which can leave a prominent scar? With the right surgeon, your skin story can still have a happy ending.

More people are diagnosed with skin cancer each year in the United States than all other cancers combined:

  • One in five people in the U.S. will develop skin cancer by 70 years of age.
  • Approximately 5.3 million nonmelanoma skin cancers are diagnosed each year, resulting in more than 18,000 deaths.
  • Approximately 178,560 cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year, and one person dies of melanoma every hour.

Thanks to skin cancer awareness month every May, early detection and treatment of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers is on the rise. Ultimately survival is the name of the game, but effective skin cancer removal can also leave patients with an unwanted reminder of their ordeal — an unsightly scar.

Most skin cancers are found on the face, which can lead to disfiguring or aesthetically unpleasing scars. That’s where the value of a facial plastic surgeon comes in.

“Facial plastic surgeons are seeing more and more patients who require a skilled facial plastic surgeon to perform the skin cancer removal and reconstructive surgery to repair the area because we possess a thorough understanding of the structures of the face,” said William H. Truswell, MD, president of the AAFPRS. “Carefully removing the skin cancer cells and providing aesthetically pleasing results is the goal.”

According to the latest annual survey from the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS), skin cancer is the primary reason facial plastic surgeons perform reconstructive surgery, with 83% of member surgeons having performed skin cancer/Mohs surgery last year.

The AAFPRS reminds patients to select a board-certified surgeon that specializes in plastic surgery of the face, head and neck. In addition, research surgeons and procedural information via trusted online sources like www.aafprs.org.

For more information or to be connected with a member of the AAFPRS,

Contact KELZ PR – Patty Mathews (pattymathews@kelzpr.com).
https://www.skincancer.org/skin-cancer-information/skin-cancer-facts

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